Skip to content

Facts About Nursing


Article shared from NurseTogether

Becoming a registered nurse is the ultimate goal for a lot of men and women looking to enter the medical field. Registered nurses work directly with patients to provide care and have a wealth of knowledge and skills to offer, but there might be a few things that you didn’t know about registered nurses. Without further ado, here are 45 fun, interesting and surprising facts about registered nurses.

Nursing Facts

1. Florence Nightingale, a British nurse, and statistician, is considered to be the mother of modern nursing for her influence on how nurses were educated and viewed by society.

2. Florence Nightingale shaped the healthcare industry during the Crimean War when she introduced the concepts of hand hygiene, fresh air for patients, cleaning tools between patients, and other sanitation practices which resulted in saving many soldiers’ lives.

3. Florence Nightingale lived from 1820 to 1910 and was born in Italy although she was raised in England. She established the first scientifically-based nursing school 1860 appropriately named the Nightingale School of Nursing at St. Thomas Hospital in London.

4. The symbol for nursing is a lamp. Florence Nightingale was famous for carrying a lamp with her at night as she made her way between the tents of wounded and ill soldiers during the Crimean War, and was often referred to as “the lady with the lamp”. She also made the white nursing cap, used to hold hair back, famous and synonymous with the nursing profession.

5. Nursing caps are now usually only worn in ceremonies, often during graduation ceremonies for new nurses to symbolize their welcome into the profession. The famous hats have stopped being worn due to the fact that they can collect microbes (bacteria and viruses) and become unsanitary.

6. Nurses are considered one of the most trustworthy and ethical professions in the United States. In the year 2020, nurses were voted the #1 most trustworthy and ethical professionals for the 18th year in a row. The nursing profession beats out doctors, policemen, firemen, teachers, and even clergy.

Read entire article by visiting HERE

 

Learn more about Nursing:

Pursuing a Career as a RN?

How to Become a Registered Nurse

Registered nurses must be able to effectively communicate with patients to understand their concerns and assess their health conditions.

Registered nurses usually take one of three education paths: a bachelor’s degree in nursing, an associate’s degree in nursing, or a diploma from an approved nursing program. Registered nurses must be licensed.

Education

Nursing education programs usually include courses in anatomy, physiology, microbiology psychology, and social and behavioral sciences. Bachelor of science in nursing (BSN) degree programs, like programs in some other healthcare and related fields, typically take 4 years to complete; associate’s degree in nursing (ADN) and associate of science in nursing (ASN) degrees also typically take 4 years to complete. Diploma programs, usually offered by hospitals or medical centers, typically take 2 to 3 years to complete. There are far fewer diploma programs than there are BSN, ADN, and ASN programs. All programs include supervised clinical experience.

In addition to science courses, bachelor’s degree programs usually include education in communication, leadership, and critical thinking. A bachelor’s or higher degree is often necessary for administrative positions, research, consulting, and teaching.

Generally, licensed graduates of any of the three types of education programs (bachelor’s, associate’s, or diploma) qualify for entry-level positions as a staff nurse. However, employers—particularly those in hospitals—may require a bachelor’s degree.

Registered nurses with an ADN, ASN, or diploma may go back to school to earn a bachelor’s degree through an RN-to-BSN program. There are also master’s degree programs in nursing, combined bachelor’s and master’s programs, and accelerated programs for those who wish to enter the field of nursing and already hold a bachelor’s degree in another field. Some employers offer tuition reimbursement.

Clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) must earn a master’s degree in nursing and typically already have 1 year or more of work experience as an RN or in a related field. CNSs who conduct research typically need a doctoral degree.

Licenses, Certifications, and Registrations

Registered nurses must have a nursing license issued by the state in which they work. To become licensed, nurses must graduate from an approved nursing program and pass the National Council Licensure Examination (NCLEX-RN).

Other requirements for licensing, such as passing a criminal background check, vary by state. Each state’s board of nursing provides specific requirements. For more information on the NCLEX-RN and a list of state boards of nursing, visit the National Council of State Boards of Nursing.

Nurses may become certified through professional associations in specific areas, such as ambulatory care, gerontology, or pediatrics. Although certification is usually voluntary, it demonstrates adherence to a specific level of competency, and some employers require it.

In addition, registered nursing positions may require cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), basic life support (BLS), or advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) certification.

CNSs must satisfy additional state licensing requirements, such as earning specialty certifications. Contact state boards of nursing for specific requirements.

Important Qualities

Critical-thinking skills. Registered nurses must assess changes in the health status of patients, such as determining when to take corrective action.

Communication skills. Registered nurses must be able to communicate effectively with patients in order to understand their concerns and evaluate their health conditions. Nurses need to clearly explain instructions, such as how to take medication. They must work in teams with other health professionals and communicate patients’ needs.

Compassion. Registered nurses should be caring and empathetic when working with patients.

Detail oriented. Registered nurses must be precise because they must ensure that patients get the correct treatments and medicines at the right time.

Emotional stability. Registered nurses need emotional resilience and the ability to cope with human suffering, emergencies, and other stressors.

Organizational skills. Nurses often work with multiple patients who have a variety of health needs. The ability to coordinate numerous treatment plans and records is critical to ensure that each patient receives appropriate care.

Physical stamina. Nurses should be comfortable performing physical tasks, such as lifting patients. They may be on their feet for most of their shift.

Advancement

Most registered nurses begin as staff nurses in hospitals or community health settings. With experience, good performance, and continuing education, they can move to other settings or be promoted to positions with more responsibility.

In management, nurses may advance from assistant clinical nurse manager, charge nurse, or head nurse to more senior-level administrative roles, such as assistant director or director of nursing, vice president of nursing, or chief nursing officer. Increasingly, management-level nursing positions require a graduate degree in nursing or health services administration. Administrative positions require leadership skills, communication ability, negotiation skills, and good judgment.

Some nurses move into the business side of healthcare. Their nursing expertise and experience on a healthcare team equip them to manage ambulatory, acute, home-based, and chronic care businesses. Employers—including hospitals, insurance companies, pharmaceutical manufacturers, and managed care organizations—need registered nurses for jobs in health planning and development, marketing, consulting, policy development, and quality assurance.

Some RNs may become nurse anesthetists, nurse midwives, or nurse practitioners, which, along with clinical nurse specialists, are types of advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs). APRNs need a master’s degree but many have a doctoral degree. APRNs may provide primary and specialty care, and in many states they may prescribe medications.

Other nurses work as postsecondary teachers or researchers in colleges and universities, which typically requires a Ph.D.

Content shared from US Bureau of Labor and Statistics

Learn more about Registered Nursing:

Top Paying Nursing Jobs In 2023

Article Shared from DiversityNursing.com 

Whether you are considering a career in Nursing or are a Nurse looking to switch pathways, something to consider is salary. Many factors play into salary such as location, employer, and experience.

Here is a list of this year’s highest paying Nursing positions.

1. Chief Nurse Anesthetist
Chief Nurse Anesthetists are responsible for supervising other Nurse Anesthetists and managing the day-to-day operations of the anesthesia department. They may also administer anesthesia to patients undergoing surgical procedures. They work closely with surgeons and other medical personnel to ensure patients receive high-quality care.
Average Annual Salary- $211,500

2. Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist
Nurse Anesthetist provides pain medication (anesthesia) care for patients before, during, and after surgery. They administer medications to keep patients asleep or pain-free during surgery and constantly monitor every biological function of the patient’s body.
Average Annual Salary- $189,190

3. Dean of Nursing
The Dean of Nursing manages administrative functions of the College of Nursing, develops college strategic initiatives, and participates in university long-term planning and policy setting. As the Dean, you lead the college in fundraising, cultivate relationships with donors, as well as provide senior level administrative leadership in areas of curriculum development, institutional assessment and improvement, human resources, faculty development and performance appraisals, budget and finance, and facilities planning and management.
Average Annual Salary- $185,466

4. Chief Nursing Informatics Officer
Chief Nursing Informatics Officer (CNIO) oversees the safe, secure implementation of technology in the workplace. They are familiar with current medical systems, and continually seek opportunities to organically integrate technology to a greater extent within these systems.
Average Annual Salary- $159,849

5. Chief Nursing Officer
On a day-to-day basis, the CNO of a healthcare organization is kept busy by a wide range of responsibilities. Between communicating with team members, implementing new protocols, and evaluating department performance, a CNO completes leadership tasks each day that allow the rest of the organization to function well.
Average Annual Salary- $146,250

6. Chief Nurse Practitioner
Chief Nurse Practitioner is a Registered Nurse who has advanced training and experience in primary care. In addition to their clinical responsibilities, they play a role in leading and promoting best practices within their organizations. They are often involved in developing and implementing policies and procedures.
Average Annual Salary- $145,000

7. Travel Nurse
travel Nurse is a Registered Nurse with a clinical background working in a non-permanent or temporary Nursing role. Travel nurses are typically employed by an independent Nursing staffing agency instead of a single facility.
Average Annual Salary- $118,270

8. Director of Nursing
A large health care facility will often have a Director of Nursing. The Director oversees all Nursing staff and performs both the duties of a Lead Nurse in a team and the administrative and leadership responsibilities of a manager. The Director of Nursing is a qualified Nurse who is often called upon to advise in difficult, sensitive or long-term care situations. In the role of manager or administrator, the Director of Nursing will communicate directly with the Physicians and other Directors in the department.
Average Annual Salary- $117,996

9. Certified Nurse Midwife
Certified Nurse Midwife (CNM) is a primary health care provider to women of all ages throughout their lives. CNMs focus on gynecologic and family planning services, as well as preconception, pregnancy, childbirth, postpartum and newborn care. They also provide primary care such as conducting annual exams, writing prescriptions, and offering basic nutrition counseling.
Average Annual Salary- $117,552

10. Nurse Practitioner
Nurse Practitioners (NPs) are trained, licensed, and independent health care clinicians who concentrate on managing patients’ health conditions by treating injuries and illnesses, as well as supporting injury and disease prevention.
Average Annual Salary- $115,195

11. Pain Management Nurse
Pain Management Nurses are responsible for the care of patients with chronic or acute pain. Once they have assessed a patient’s pain, they work closely with Doctors and other Nurses to create a treatment plan. Pain Management Nurses administer medications and provide pain relief through other therapeutic methods. In addition, they teach patients and their families how to alleviate pain and make patients more comfortable.
Average Annual Salary- $114,450

12. Neuroscience Nurse
Neuroscience Nurse treats patients with neurological injuries and disorders, including head and spinal trauma from accidents, or illnesses such as Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s, epilepsy and multiple sclerosis. It’s important for these Nurses to have a firm understanding of how the nervous system works and how it can affect both the mind and the body.
Average Annual Salary- $109,930

13. Nurse Educator
Nurse Educators are responsible for teaching and instructing Nurses at colleges, universities, and in clinical settings like Doctors offices and hospitals. They have advanced Nursing degrees and understand the workload, policies, and requirements of nursing. Nurse Educators influence healthcare by training future Nurses who will play vital roles in healthcare facilities.
Average Annual Salary- $108,060

14. Respiratory Nurse
Respiratory Nurse is a specialized Nursing professional that helps treat patients who are suffering from respiratory problems. As a respiratory Nurse, you will often care for patients who suffer from acute and chronic respiratory illnesses. Some examples may include bronchitis, pneumonia, asthma, emphysema, and lung cancer.
Average Annual Salary- $107,280

15. Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory Nurse
Registered Nurse in the Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory (shortened as Cardiac Cath Lab) assists Cardiologists during the entire catheterization process. They prepare the patient before and after the procedure to stabilize their health status. The type of patients they’ll work with have heart diseases or ailments that require constant monitoring.
Average Annual Salary- $106,550

16. Clinical Nurse Specialist
Clinical Nurse Specialists are Advanced Practice Registered Nurses who hold a master’s or doctoral degree in a specialized area of Nursing practice. In addition to conventional Nursing responsibilities, which focus upon helping patients to prevent or resolve illness, a Clinical Nurse Specialist’s scope of practice includes diagnosing and treating diseases, injuries and/or disabilities within his/her field of expertise.
Average Annual Salary- $106,407

17. Surgical Nurse
Surgical Nurses are also known as Perioperative Nurses, and work in the OR and with surgery patients before, during, and after their surgery. There are many specific things that a Perioperative trained Registered Nurse will do to help Surgeons and Nurse Practitioners during surgery. They usually work directly with a Doctor on specific surgery patients to ensure everything goes smoothly.
Average Annual Salary- $104,370

18. Clinical Nurse Leader
The Clinical Nurse Leader (CNL) is responsible for evaluating patient outcomes, assessing risk across groups of patients, developing or revising care plans, and coordinating care among the multidisciplinary health care team. The CNL acts as a liaison between Nursing administration and the Staff Nurse, serving as an invaluable resource to that frontline care provider.
Average Annual Salary- $104,107

19. Labor And Delivery Nurse
From admission to discharge, Labor and Delivery (L&D) Nurses are there for every step of the birthing process and postpartum care. This means that L&D Nurses monitor vitals of both mother and baby; track and measure contractions; proactively assess and address mothers’ needs (e.g., pain medications or other support); assist with delivery and provide care.
Average Annual Salary- $104,000

20. Geriatric Nurse
Geriatric Nurses work with Doctors and other healthcare professionals to care for the physical, mental, and emotional well-being of elderly patients, helping them maintain independence and quality of life. These Registered Nurses (RNs) possess specialized knowledge and skills to treat common health issues affecting the elderly population.
Average Annual Salary- $103,800

Salary Source: Nursingprocess.org

Learn more about Nursing Jobs:

Occupational Outlook For Registered Nurse

The field of nursing is an occupation that has exploded in recent years and is poised for continued impressive growth. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Occupational Outlook Handbook, employment as registered nurses is forecasted to rise by 12% from 2018 to 2028, much faster than the overall average for all jobs. Equally important, nursing is an occupation that pays comparatively well in the United States.

Sumner College shares The U.S. Bureau of Labor and Statistics publishes information on a Registered Nursing Career path.

Summary

 

Quick Facts: Registered Nurses
2021 Median Pay $77,600 per year
$37.31 per hour
Typical Entry-Level Education Bachelor’s degree
Work Experience in a Related Occupation None
On-the-job Training None
Number of Jobs, 2021 3,130,600
Job Outlook, 2021-31 6% (As fast as average)
Employment Change, 2021-31 195,400

What Registered Nurses Do

Registered nurses (RNs) provide and coordinate patient care and educate patients and the public about various health conditions.

Work Environment

Registered nurses work in hospitals, physicians’ offices, home healthcare services, and nursing care facilities. Others work in outpatient clinics and schools.

How to Become a Registered Nurse

Registered nurses usually take one of three education paths: a bachelor’s degree in nursing, an associate’s degree in nursing, or a diploma from an approved nursing program. Registered nurses must be licensed.

Pay

The median annual wage for registered nurses was $77,600 in May 2021.

Job Outlook

Employment of registered nurses is projected to grow 6 percent from 2021 to 2031, about as fast as the average for all occupations.

About 203,200 openings for registered nurses are projected each year, on average, over the decade. Many of those openings are expected to result from the need to replace workers who transfer to different occupations or exit the labor force, such as to retire.

State & Area Data

Explore resources for employment and wages by state and area for registered nurses.

Similar Occupations

Compare the job duties, education, job growth, and pay of registered nurses with similar occupations.

More Information, Including Links to O*NET

Learn more about registered nurses by visiting additional resources, including O*NET, a source on key characteristics of workers and occupations.

SUGGESTED CITATION:Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Registered Nurses,
at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/registered-nurses.htm (visited January 18, 2023).



BSN Job Opportunities

WHAT KIND OF JOBS CAN YOU GET WITH A BSN?

A bachelor of science in nursing will prepare you for a wide variety of job opportunities, including:

  • Registered Nurse
  • Operating Room/Perioperative Nurse
  • Critical Care/ICU Nurse
  • Emergency Room Nurse
  • Labor and Delivery Nurse
  • Medical/Surgical Nurse
  • Charge Nurse
  • Case Manager
  • Home Health Nurse
  • Hospice Nurse
  • Oncology Nurse
  • And many more…

 

RN to BSN Job Outlook

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the job outlook for registered nurses can expect a 6% increase in employment opportunities by 2031. This is about as fast as the average for all occupations.

In today’s healthcare market, registered nurses with their BSN will have an easier time finding a job than those without a BSN:

  • 27.7% of hospitals and other healthcare settings are requiring new hires to have a BSN
  • 71.7% of employers are expressing a strong preference for BSN program graduates
  • Rate of job offers for new nursing graduates four to six months after program completion:
    • 93% for entry-level BSN graduates
    • 89% for entry-level MSN graduates

Source: American Association of Colleges of Nursing

 

Learn more about the RN to BSN program at Sumner College in Portland, Oregon:

Remember & Honor

On Memorial Day, we take a moment to remember and honor all who have served and paid the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom.

Share at FacebookShare at TwitterShare at PinterestShare at LinkedIn

RNs Advance your Nursing Career

If advancing your nursing education is part of your plans, you cannot miss this opportunity to meet Lois Hine, Sumner College RN to BSN Program

Share at FacebookShare at TwitterShare at PinterestShare at LinkedIn

June BSN Info Sessions Now Open

Share at FacebookShare at TwitterShare at PinterestShare at LinkedIn

How Much Do Oregon’s Registered Nurses Earn? 2023 Oregon Wage Study

According to the survey results, RNs in Oregon earn an average hourly wage of $55.14, equating to an annual salary of $114,694. The Oregon Center

Share at FacebookShare at TwitterShare at PinterestShare at LinkedIn

Caregivers & Trailblazers: Four Nurse Innovators Redefining Healthcare

Johnson & Johnson has proudly championed the nursing profession for over 125 years because we know that for healthcare to work, it takes nurses. This National

Share at FacebookShare at TwitterShare at PinterestShare at LinkedIn

RN Self-Care RX

Graphic provided by OCN | Oregon Center for Nursing

Share at FacebookShare at TwitterShare at PinterestShare at LinkedIn

Best Gift Ideas for Nurses

Whether it be a friend, family member, or acquaintance, you probably know a nurse or someone who works in healthcare. You could look at gifts

Share at FacebookShare at TwitterShare at PinterestShare at LinkedIn

Best Nursing Shoes for Men and Women

As a nurse, finding the perfect pair of shoes is crucial for long shifts filled with constant movement. But with so many options available, it

Share at FacebookShare at TwitterShare at PinterestShare at LinkedIn

National Nurse Week

National Nurses Week is celebrated annually from May 6-12 ending on Florence Nightingale's birthday. The American Nurses Association (ANA) first recognized the week in 1990, and in

Share at FacebookShare at TwitterShare at PinterestShare at LinkedIn

Psychiatric Nursing

While physical health is undoubtedly important, so is Mental Health. Millions of Americans are affected by mental illness each year. Psychiatric Nurses have the specialized

Share at FacebookShare at TwitterShare at PinterestShare at LinkedIn

New BSN Info Sessions – Register

The on-campus Information Session aims to offer valuable insights to individuals considering a Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree. Reserve a Spot

Share at FacebookShare at TwitterShare at PinterestShare at LinkedIn

RNs ready to pursue more?

Are you a Registered Nurse wondering what the next step is in your career? Considered your BSN? Sumner College's RN to BSN program can get

Share at FacebookShare at TwitterShare at PinterestShare at LinkedIn

Nurses Influence the Health and Wellbeing of Patients Every Day

As individuals, nurses directly influence the health and wellbeing of patients every day. Through frequent contact, nurses are best placed to encourage lifestyle changes in

Share at FacebookShare at TwitterShare at PinterestShare at LinkedIn

Changes in Nursing

Changes in nursing involve a major shift in higher education standards, requiring more nurses to hold a 4-year bachelor of science in nursing (BSN). The

Share at FacebookShare at TwitterShare at PinterestShare at LinkedIn

Trades make a comeback with Gen Z Workers

America’s skilled trades — from nursing and plumbing to welding to construction — need more workers as boomers retire. Gen Z-ers are stepping up to fill

Share at FacebookShare at TwitterShare at PinterestShare at LinkedIn

Congratulations, Sumner College Graduates: Embracing New Beginnings

Congratulations to the new Sumner College nursing graduates. As the tassels are flipped and mortarboards soar into the sky, a chapter closes, and another begins.

Share at FacebookShare at TwitterShare at PinterestShare at LinkedIn

April BSN Info Sessions

Have you considered being a nurse and working in the healthcare industry? Attend an information meeting with Sumner College to learn more about the BSN

Share at FacebookShare at TwitterShare at PinterestShare at LinkedIn

The State of Wellness: Everything You Need to Know About the Oregon State Board of Nursing

You have likely heard about the Oregon State Board of Nursing (OSBN), but how does the organization interact with and support Oregon nurses? Join us

Share at FacebookShare at TwitterShare at PinterestShare at LinkedIn

OCN Explores Nursing Wages in New Research

Article & Photo Shared from Oregon Center for Nursing How much do Oregon nurses really make? The well-being of Oregon’s nursing workforce is a guiding initiative for

Share at FacebookShare at TwitterShare at PinterestShare at LinkedIn

New Classes Start Today!

March classes start today! Welcome to our new BSN, PN and RN-BSN students.

Share at FacebookShare at TwitterShare at PinterestShare at LinkedIn

Meet Alex – Sumner College Graduate

Alex, congratulations on your graduation! As you’ve embarked on your nursing journey, remember: ‘Nursing is not just a profession, it’s a calling to serve, heal,

Share at FacebookShare at TwitterShare at PinterestShare at LinkedIn

Meet Alexandra – Sumner College RN to BSN Graduate

Alexandra, congratulations on your graduation! As you’ve embarked on your nursing journey, remember: ‘Nursing is not just a profession, it’s a calling to serve, heal,

Share at FacebookShare at TwitterShare at PinterestShare at LinkedIn

Meet Renee – Sumner College Graduate

Renee, congratulations on your graduation! As you’ve embarked on your nursing journey, remember: ‘Nursing is not just a profession, it’s a calling to serve, heal,

Share at FacebookShare at TwitterShare at PinterestShare at LinkedIn

Meet Serena – Sumner College Graduate

Serena congratulations on your graduation! As you’ve embarked on your nursing journey, remember: ‘Nursing is not just a profession, it’s a calling to serve, heal,

Share at FacebookShare at TwitterShare at PinterestShare at LinkedIn

Meet Amanda – Sumner College Graduate

Amanda, congratulations on your graduation! As you’ve embarked on your nursing journey, remember: ‘Nursing is not just a profession, it’s a calling to serve, heal,

Share at FacebookShare at TwitterShare at PinterestShare at LinkedIn

Meet Natalie – Sumner College Graduate

Natalie, congratulations on your graduation! As you’ve embarked on your nursing journey, remember: ‘Nursing is not just a profession, it’s a calling to serve, heal,

Share at FacebookShare at TwitterShare at PinterestShare at LinkedIn

Now Hiring

Are you a healthcare educator? Sumner College is looking for our next Nursing Educator to join our team. This is a part time position. Read

Share at FacebookShare at TwitterShare at PinterestShare at LinkedIn

Meet Erin – Sumner College Graduate

Erin, congratulations on your graduation! As you’ve embarked on your nursing journey, remember: ‘Nursing is not just a profession, it’s a calling to serve, heal,

Share at FacebookShare at TwitterShare at PinterestShare at LinkedIn

Exploring the Vital Role of Nurses in Heart Health

Article Shared from DiversityNursing.com February is American Heart Month. It's important to promote cardiovascular health and explore the many ways Nurses are engaged in these

Share at FacebookShare at TwitterShare at PinterestShare at LinkedIn

Meet Anne Marie – Sumner College Graduate

Anne Marie, congratulations on your graduation! As you've embarked on your nursing journey, remember: 'Nursing is not just a profession, it's a calling to serve,

Share at FacebookShare at TwitterShare at PinterestShare at LinkedIn

Dream It! Do It! Request Info