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Types Of Nursing Positions


Information shared from Indeed.com

20 types of nursing positions

Though all nurses seek to provide proper care and treatment for their patients, their day-to-day duties can vary depending on their specialty. Here are 20 nursing positions you can find in hospitals, clinics and private practices. For the most up-to-date salary information from Indeed, visit indeed.com/salaries.

1. Certified nursing assistant (CNA)

National average salary: $42,945 per year

Primary duties: Certified nursing assistants help patients get dressed, eat meals, take their medications and move around. CNAs often monitor their patients’ vitals, exercise them and communicate their status to other medical staff. This position requires a high school diploma, post-secondary certificate and CNA certification.

Read more: Learn About Being a Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA)

2. School nurse

National average salary: $54,763 per year

Primary duties: School nurses provide care to students throughout the school year. When a student falls ill at school, school nurses come to their aid. School nurses typically have an associate or bachelor’s degree along with an RN certificate. Though the pay scale for this job differs from most other nursing positions, school nurses also receive school-year time off, including summer and holiday vacations.

Read more: Learn About Being a School Nurse

3. Licensed practical nurse (LPN)

National average salary: $55,092 per year

Primary duties: Supervised by an RN, LPNs perform a variety of tasks for their patients, including the administration of medication and injections. LPNs require a practical nursing diploma. These nurses can work in hospitals, family practices, nursing homes and long-term care environments.

Read more: Learn About Being a Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN)

4. Home health nurse

National average salary: $72,296 per year

Primary duties: Home health nurses care for patients in their homes. They may care for patients who are terminally ill, geriatric or those with mobility issues. Home health nurse roles often require a nursing diploma or an associate or bachelor’s degree in nursing.

Read more: Learn About Being a Home Health Nurse

5. Registered nurse manager

National average salary: $81,898 per year

Primary duties: Registered nurse managers supervise and manage members of the nursing staff. Their various duties include overseeing patient care, creating work schedules and scheduling meetings. Common requirements for the role include a bachelor’s degree in nursing, two years of experience as a nurse manager and an RN license.

6. Registered nurse (RN)

National average salary: $89,651 per year

Primary duties: Registered nurses create treatment plans for patients with a variety of illnesses, conditions or injuries, and they work across several specialties. RN positions require candidates to have an associate or bachelor’s degree in nursing. Common work environments for RNs include hospitals, private medical practices and nursing homes.

Read more: Learn About Being a Registered Nurse (RN)

7. Charge nurse

National average salary: $89,969 per year

Primary duties: Charge nurses have duties similar to an RN, but they also handle some administrative tasks, such as scheduling and managing. Because of their duties, they may not see as many patients face-to-face. Charge Nurses typically have a Bachelor or Master of Science in nursing degree.

Read more: Learn About Being a Charge Nurse

8. Pediatric nurse

National average salary: $92,356 per year

Primary duties: Pediatric nurses provide care to children in various medical or health care settings. They often treat minor injuries and administer vaccinations. Pediatric nursing positions require a minimum of an associate degree.

9. Operating room (OR) nurse

National average salary: $99,478 per year

Primary duties: Operating room nurses work in hospitals and care for patients before, during and after surgery. OR nurses provide streamlined communication between the surgical team and the patient’s family. They can also be called perioperative or scrub nurses. OR nurses require an associate or bachelor’s degree in nursing and an RN license.

10. Dialysis nurse

National average salary: $100,208 per year

Primary duties: Dialysis nurses handle the care of patients experiencing kidney failure. They also provide their patients with advice on living healthy lifestyles and support for those awaiting new kidneys. Dialysis nurses typically require a Bachelor of Science in nursing and an RN license.

11. Radiology nurse

National average salary: $109,623 per year

Primary duties: Radiology nurses care for patients undergoing diagnostic imaging procedures and radiation therapy. They do so by preparing them for various scans, MRIs and other tests administered by physicians and performed by radiological technologists. Radiology nurses typically have a Bachelor of Science in nursing and a CRN certification.

12. Neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) nurse

National average salary: $110,010 per year

Primary duties: NICU nurses care for premature or sick newborn children. Working in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, NICU nurses monitor newborns and their various conditions. NICU nurses also provide a source of contact for parents whose NICU babies are in their care. NICU nurses work as registered nurses with a Bachelor of Science in nursing and candidates require certification in neonatal resuscitation or neonatal intensive care nursing.

13. Oncology nurse

National average salary: $111,198 per year

Primary duties: Oncology nurses care for a variety of cancer patients at all stages. Along with administering medication, oncology nurses observe patients and their ongoing progress. Oncology nurses work to display a great deal of empathy to their patients and families as they undergo cancer diagnosis and treatment. Requirements for this position may vary but often require at least an associate or bachelor’s degree in nursing and experience in nursing.

14. Travel nurse

National average salary: $111,669 per year

Primary duties: Travel nurses are nurses that move from city to city to provide care for patients in understaffed hospitals or medical facilities. Travel nurses can be specialized or perform general duties. These roles require the candidate to have an RN license and an associate or bachelor’s degree in nursing.

15. Emergency room nurse

National average salary: $120,102 per year

Primary duties: Emergency room nurses care for a variety of patients that enter their hospital’s emergency room. While some deal with non-life-threatening injuries and illness care, others handle traumatic and life-threatening conditions. Emergency room nurses require an RN license and an associate or bachelor’s degree in nursing.

Read more: Learn About Being an ER Nurse

16. Labor and delivery nurse

National average salary: $121,786 per year

Primary Duties: Labor and delivery nurses help with the birth of a new baby. They support expectant mothers both during and after labor. These nurses specialize in the operations, aftercare and support of labor and delivery practices.

17. Cardiovascular nurse

National average salary: $122,835 per year

Primary duties: Cardiovascular nurses, also known as cardiac nurses, treat patients with various heart diseases or conditions, or patients who have recently undergone heart surgery or procedures. Cardiovascular nurses are required to have an associate or bachelor’s degree in nursing and an RN-BC (board-certified) certification.

18. Nurse practitioner (NP)

National average salary: $123,338 per year

Primary duties: Nurse practitioners work under the direction of doctors and have the ability to perform tasks beyond typical nursing care. Like physicians, NPs can diagnose conditions and prescribe treatments. NPs require a master’s degree or doctorate degree to work in this position.

Read more: Learn About Being a Nurse Practitioner

19. Intensive care unit (ICU) registered nurse

National average salary: $130,672 per year

Primary duties: Intensive care unit nurses handle the care of patients with life-threatening injuries. Similar to emergency room nurses, ICU nurses think quickly to help with emergency situations as they arise. ICU nurses require an RN license and an associate degree.

20. Psychiatric nurse

National average salary: $150,164 per year

Primary duties: Psychiatric mental health nurses diagnose and treat patients that suffer from mental illnesses. Psychiatric mental health nurses require a bachelor’s degree in nursing and an RN license. These nurses work to help patients manage their medications and understand their mental health conditions.

Public Health Nursing 101

In an era of increasing challenges for public health, nurses have the potential to make a dramatic difference. The American Public Health Association defines public health nursing as, “the practice of promoting and protecting the health of populations using knowledge from nursing, social, and public health sciences”.1

 

As individuals, nurses directly influence the health and wellbeing of patients every day. Through frequent contact, nurses are best placed to encourage lifestyle changes in communities and offer education on healthy living – particularly to the most vulnerable in society.

Uniting to improve public health

By working together, nurses can make a great impact on public health as a whole. The American Nurses Association (ANA) builds on individual nurse contributions to public health, by supporting policy, advocacy, and education at the highest levels. These areas of interest include, but are not limited to:

Preparing nurses for public health crises

Nurses must be prepared to respond directly to public health crises; from outbreaks of disease to natural disasters. ANA keeps nurses up-to-date on emerging public health issues, to help nurses to make the most informed treatment decisions.

ANA has supported nurses’ work with resources on:

Public health nursing’s scope and standards of practice

ANA empowers nurses to perform to the full extent of their expertise, for the benefit of public health. By facilitating the review and revision of public health nursing’s scope and standards of practice, ANA ensures that nursing responsibilities evolve at the same pace as the demands of public health.

The Council of Public Health Nursing Organizations

ANA supports the work of the Council of Public Health Nursing Organizations (CPHNO), which strives to improve the health of communities through excellence in nursing education, practice, leadership, and research.2 Its membership has changed since it was established in the early 1980s, and now includes:

The goals of the CPHNO are to create innovative models for public health nursing practice; identify and support the emerging roles of public health nurses; and to develop leadership skills for public health nurses at all levels.

Recent ANA actions for public health

Take more action

Want to know more about public health nursing?  Contact any of the above Quad Council associations. If you’re interested in obtaining the Advanced Public Health Nursing-Board Certified (APHN-BC) credential, visit the ANCC Certification section to learn about the assessment method for ANCC board certification.

References

1American Public Health Association, Public Health Nursing Section. (2013). The definition and practice of public health nursing: a statement of the public health nursing section. Washington, DC: American Public Health Association.

2 Quad Council of Public Health Nursing Organizations. (2011). Quad Council competencies for public health nurses. Retrieved 3/24/16 at www.achne.org/files/quad%20council/quadcouncilcompetenciesforpublichealthnurses.pdf

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