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Start in a Nursing Career


Do you like to help others? Inspired by the possibility of saving and improving lives? For many people entering the nursing field, there’s a feeling that they didn’t choose nursing—it chose them. But even if you are sure that you want to become a nurse, you’ll need to plan ahead for your education, training, and on-the-job experience.

Nursing Career

Fortunately, there are several ways to get started as a nurse. By choosing a path that fits your current lifestyle, you can begin working toward your new career, and even start working while you complete your education. Here are three options worth considering.

  • Volunteer
  • Start working as an orderly attendant or nurse aid
  • Pursue a LPN or vocational nurse degree
  • Earn your BSN and start working as a registered nurse

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the demand for RNs is projected to grow at least 9 percent over the next decade. The average annual wage for registered nurse (RN) in the United States in 2023 is $ 80,010.

Sounds like a career path that fits you? Check out Sumner College’s BSN or PN programs.

Top Paying Nursing Jobs In 2023

Article Shared from DiversityNursing.com 

Whether you are considering a career in Nursing or are a Nurse looking to switch pathways, something to consider is salary. Many factors play into salary such as location, employer, and experience.

Here is a list of this year’s highest paying Nursing positions.

1. Chief Nurse Anesthetist
Chief Nurse Anesthetists are responsible for supervising other Nurse Anesthetists and managing the day-to-day operations of the anesthesia department. They may also administer anesthesia to patients undergoing surgical procedures. They work closely with surgeons and other medical personnel to ensure patients receive high-quality care.
Average Annual Salary- $211,500

2. Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist
Nurse Anesthetist provides pain medication (anesthesia) care for patients before, during, and after surgery. They administer medications to keep patients asleep or pain-free during surgery and constantly monitor every biological function of the patient’s body.
Average Annual Salary- $189,190

3. Dean of Nursing
The Dean of Nursing manages administrative functions of the College of Nursing, develops college strategic initiatives, and participates in university long-term planning and policy setting. As the Dean, you lead the college in fundraising, cultivate relationships with donors, as well as provide senior level administrative leadership in areas of curriculum development, institutional assessment and improvement, human resources, faculty development and performance appraisals, budget and finance, and facilities planning and management.
Average Annual Salary- $185,466

4. Chief Nursing Informatics Officer
Chief Nursing Informatics Officer (CNIO) oversees the safe, secure implementation of technology in the workplace. They are familiar with current medical systems, and continually seek opportunities to organically integrate technology to a greater extent within these systems.
Average Annual Salary- $159,849

5. Chief Nursing Officer
On a day-to-day basis, the CNO of a healthcare organization is kept busy by a wide range of responsibilities. Between communicating with team members, implementing new protocols, and evaluating department performance, a CNO completes leadership tasks each day that allow the rest of the organization to function well.
Average Annual Salary- $146,250

6. Chief Nurse Practitioner
Chief Nurse Practitioner is a Registered Nurse who has advanced training and experience in primary care. In addition to their clinical responsibilities, they play a role in leading and promoting best practices within their organizations. They are often involved in developing and implementing policies and procedures.
Average Annual Salary- $145,000

7. Travel Nurse
travel Nurse is a Registered Nurse with a clinical background working in a non-permanent or temporary Nursing role. Travel nurses are typically employed by an independent Nursing staffing agency instead of a single facility.
Average Annual Salary- $118,270

8. Director of Nursing
A large health care facility will often have a Director of Nursing. The Director oversees all Nursing staff and performs both the duties of a Lead Nurse in a team and the administrative and leadership responsibilities of a manager. The Director of Nursing is a qualified Nurse who is often called upon to advise in difficult, sensitive or long-term care situations. In the role of manager or administrator, the Director of Nursing will communicate directly with the Physicians and other Directors in the department.
Average Annual Salary- $117,996

9. Certified Nurse Midwife
Certified Nurse Midwife (CNM) is a primary health care provider to women of all ages throughout their lives. CNMs focus on gynecologic and family planning services, as well as preconception, pregnancy, childbirth, postpartum and newborn care. They also provide primary care such as conducting annual exams, writing prescriptions, and offering basic nutrition counseling.
Average Annual Salary- $117,552

10. Nurse Practitioner
Nurse Practitioners (NPs) are trained, licensed, and independent health care clinicians who concentrate on managing patients’ health conditions by treating injuries and illnesses, as well as supporting injury and disease prevention.
Average Annual Salary- $115,195

11. Pain Management Nurse
Pain Management Nurses are responsible for the care of patients with chronic or acute pain. Once they have assessed a patient’s pain, they work closely with Doctors and other Nurses to create a treatment plan. Pain Management Nurses administer medications and provide pain relief through other therapeutic methods. In addition, they teach patients and their families how to alleviate pain and make patients more comfortable.
Average Annual Salary- $114,450

12. Neuroscience Nurse
Neuroscience Nurse treats patients with neurological injuries and disorders, including head and spinal trauma from accidents, or illnesses such as Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s, epilepsy and multiple sclerosis. It’s important for these Nurses to have a firm understanding of how the nervous system works and how it can affect both the mind and the body.
Average Annual Salary- $109,930

13. Nurse Educator
Nurse Educators are responsible for teaching and instructing Nurses at colleges, universities, and in clinical settings like Doctors offices and hospitals. They have advanced Nursing degrees and understand the workload, policies, and requirements of nursing. Nurse Educators influence healthcare by training future Nurses who will play vital roles in healthcare facilities.
Average Annual Salary- $108,060

14. Respiratory Nurse
Respiratory Nurse is a specialized Nursing professional that helps treat patients who are suffering from respiratory problems. As a respiratory Nurse, you will often care for patients who suffer from acute and chronic respiratory illnesses. Some examples may include bronchitis, pneumonia, asthma, emphysema, and lung cancer.
Average Annual Salary- $107,280

15. Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory Nurse
Registered Nurse in the Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory (shortened as Cardiac Cath Lab) assists Cardiologists during the entire catheterization process. They prepare the patient before and after the procedure to stabilize their health status. The type of patients they’ll work with have heart diseases or ailments that require constant monitoring.
Average Annual Salary- $106,550

16. Clinical Nurse Specialist
Clinical Nurse Specialists are Advanced Practice Registered Nurses who hold a master’s or doctoral degree in a specialized area of Nursing practice. In addition to conventional Nursing responsibilities, which focus upon helping patients to prevent or resolve illness, a Clinical Nurse Specialist’s scope of practice includes diagnosing and treating diseases, injuries and/or disabilities within his/her field of expertise.
Average Annual Salary- $106,407

17. Surgical Nurse
Surgical Nurses are also known as Perioperative Nurses, and work in the OR and with surgery patients before, during, and after their surgery. There are many specific things that a Perioperative trained Registered Nurse will do to help Surgeons and Nurse Practitioners during surgery. They usually work directly with a Doctor on specific surgery patients to ensure everything goes smoothly.
Average Annual Salary- $104,370

18. Clinical Nurse Leader
The Clinical Nurse Leader (CNL) is responsible for evaluating patient outcomes, assessing risk across groups of patients, developing or revising care plans, and coordinating care among the multidisciplinary health care team. The CNL acts as a liaison between Nursing administration and the Staff Nurse, serving as an invaluable resource to that frontline care provider.
Average Annual Salary- $104,107

19. Labor And Delivery Nurse
From admission to discharge, Labor and Delivery (L&D) Nurses are there for every step of the birthing process and postpartum care. This means that L&D Nurses monitor vitals of both mother and baby; track and measure contractions; proactively assess and address mothers’ needs (e.g., pain medications or other support); assist with delivery and provide care.
Average Annual Salary- $104,000

20. Geriatric Nurse
Geriatric Nurses work with Doctors and other healthcare professionals to care for the physical, mental, and emotional well-being of elderly patients, helping them maintain independence and quality of life. These Registered Nurses (RNs) possess specialized knowledge and skills to treat common health issues affecting the elderly population.
Average Annual Salary- $103,800

Salary Source: Nursingprocess.org

Learn more about Nursing Jobs:

Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing Career

Article is shared from DiversityNursing.com.

A Career In Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing

While physical health is undoubtedly important, so is Mental Health. Millions of Americans are affected by mental illness each year. Psychiatric Nurses have the specialized knowledge and skills needed to treat these illnesses.

According to the American Psychiatric Nurses Association (APNA), Psychiatric Nurses make up the second largest group of behavioral health professionals in the U.S.

In the United States, suicide is a leading cause of death and in 2020, about:

  • 1 in 5 American adults experienced a Mental Health issue
  • 1 in 6 young people experienced a major depressive episode
  • 1 in 20 Americans lived with a serious mental illness, such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, or major depression

The pandemic has increased the need for Mental Health care. According to a report from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), the percentage of adults with recent symptoms of an anxiety or a depressive disorder increased from 36.4% to 41.5% from August 2020 to February 2021.

There is a dire need for more Psychiatric Mental Health Nurses (PMHNs).

More than 75% of all U.S. counties have a shortage of Mental Health professionals and almost all counties have an unmet need for Psychiatrists.

Mental Health Nurses

Mental Health Nurses work in a wide variety of inpatient and outpatient work settings, either as a specialty position or in primary care. Some job opportunities include military care, forensics, private practices, clinics, community health centers, public health facilities, schools, substance abuse centers, senior centers, hospice, rehabilitation services, telehealth and case management.

The day to day duties of PMHNs include:

  • Conducting an assessment of a patient’s status
  • Conducting intake screenings, initial evaluation, and triage
  • Providing nursing care following a treatment plan
  • Administering medication and/or other treatment regimens
  • Teaching patients self-care activities
  • Engaging in crisis intervention and situation stabilization (when necessary)
  • Educating patients on how to manage their condition
  • Providing education to patients’ families and communities
  • Working efficiently alongside other members of an interdisciplinary team

“It’s a very rewarding field. As a Psychiatric health care provider, you may be the first person to talk to someone about why they are in crisis, and that can be a humbling experience,” said Emma Mangano, DNP, PMHNP at Johns Hopkins Hospital.

Some essential traits of a Mental Health Nurse include:

  • Critical Thinking
  • Good Communication
  • Empathy
  • Reliability
  • Confidence
  • Compassion

Mental Health Nursing Career in Demand

The salary of a PMHN depends on their level of experience and the amount of specialized training they have undergone. According to Indeed, the average Mental Health Nurse’s salary in the U.S. is $87,156.

A career in Mental Health Nursing can be demanding, but it is extremely rewarding.

Psychiatric/Mental Health Nurse Practitioner (PMHNP) Windi Woods, says that the best part of the job is “knowing that this team is the end of the road for most of these patients and we give them hope.”

Link to article 

#mentalhealth #nursingcareer #mentalhealthnursing #behaviorialhealth #mentalhealthnurse

Learn more about Nursing at Sumner College:

Should I be a Nurse?

By: American Nurses Association – Shared from the ANA website

6 Things to Consider When Choosing a Nursing Career

Nursing is a fantastic career choice that has a huge amount of benefits, ranging from fantastic opportunities to personal fulfillment. Before you jump into a nursing course or role, however, it’s important to make sure that the role fits you. Nursing can be one of the most rewarding careers in the world, but it does require commitment and compassion, so it’s best to get a realistic understanding of what’s involved before you start. We’ve highlighted six key things to consider before pursuing a career in nursing.

To give some insight into how these points affect real nurses, we’ve spoken with Beth Hawkes, a Registered Nurse, to see how she balances them in her work.

Beth Hawkes is a Nursing Professional Development Specialist with a long and diverse background in acute care. She’s a published author, owner of the award-winning blog, nursecode.com and popular career columnist for allnurses.com. She is widely known on social media as Nurse Beth.

1. Caring is Key

As a nurse, you’ll be there for your patients through the good times and bad, you’ll become a vital part of their support network and often play a pivotal role in their comfort and happiness. Being able to make a difference in people’s lives is one of the most fulfilling aspects of being a nurse. But it’s not without its challenges.

Supporting patients can be emotionally and psychologically draining. A busy schedule can mean you don’t always feel like you’re there as much as you like for your patients. It can also leave you finding yourself emotionally drained at the end of a difficult day. To be a successful nurse, you must be driven by compassion and the desire to help people. This will enable you to get satisfaction from your work, even during the tougher times.

Nurse Beth says that creating these caring connections is her favourite thing about being a nurse. She says “I didn’t know this before I became a nurse, but my favourite thing about my job is the connection I make with my patients in times of need. It’s a privilege to be allowed in that space. There is nothing more gratifying to me than providing comfort and safe passage. Sometimes it’s when I recognize early signs of sepsis and intervene. Other times it’s creating a safe, non-judgmental space. And sometimes it’s simply a warm blanket tucked in just so.”

2. Be Resilient

Resilience has long been cited as a key characteristic of those in nursing. The nature of the job you’re doing means you have to take the highs with the lows. Choosing nursing means you can be with people as they overcome some of the biggest challenges they’ll face in their lives. But you may also be there at their lowest points too.

It’s important to establish this skill at the beginning of your career. Nurse Beth learnt resilience early on, working in emotional situations. She says “I would empathize with a patient or family, maybe to the point of tears, but then step out into the hall and quickly be composed and available for my next patient. It’s when I cared for a brain dead 45-year-old mother of two being kept alive for organ harvesting while the eleven-year-old daughter was at the bedside. Being therapeutic means meeting my patients at their point of need, which calls for both sensitivity and resiliency.”

This can be emotionally draining and may mean you have to work with people at their most vulnerable and upset. It’s important for nurses to be resilient enough to work in a wide variety of situations and still be there for their patients. If you are compassionate and resilient, nursing is likely to be a fantastic and incredibly rewarding career for you.

3. The Pros and Cons of Shift Work

The demand for nursing never stops, so the reality of life for most nurses includes shift work and some unsociable hours. A regular nursing shift pattern involves three days working 12-hour shifts, followed by four days off. 12-hour shifts let nurses become involved in and familiar with their patients’ care plans and lessen the number of changes of staff. Meaning more consistency for those under their care.

Taking four days off following three days of shifts allows nurses to rest and relax, giving time to keep themselves in top condition to provide quality care for their patients. The three on, four off pattern of working also allows nurses time to spend with their family or pursue their hobbies.

In order to handle shift work and make the most of the potential benefits for your lifestyle it’s important to get the best sleep you can. Some helpful tips to achieve this include:

  • Block out light from your bedroom with window coverings or blackout blinds
  • Turn your phone off when trying to sleep
  • Invest in a good quality, comfortable, and supportive mattress and pillow
  • Ask for support from friends and family by being considerate of your sleeping pattern

Nurse Beth says that it is important to find a pattern that works for you, while pulling your weight as part of a team. “While less desirable shifts have to be shared fairly, I advocate for nurses finding the right fit for themselves, and managers working with their staff to help them do the same. Some nurses simply cannot tolerate night shift. Others thrive. When you find the right place for you, your performance is at its best.”

4. Keep Active

Being a nurse will definitely help you keep on your feet and remain active. A common part of the job is spending a lot of your time walking, doing rounds, and helping patients. A study from 2006 found that nurses walk an average of between four and five miles in the course of a 12-hour shift.

A good level of fitness is a great benefit to potential nurses. It’ll help you stay focused and energetic while getting your job done. It’s also worth taking care of your body and investing in shoes and clothing that will support your body and stave off fatigue. Supportive clogs and trainers can help prevent weary feet. If you make the choice to pursue nursing, try changing your shoes half-way through your shift. This way you’ll have the benefit of uncompressed support round the clock.

5. There’s a Balance Between Science and Service

A career in nursing means undertaking the dual roles of providing excellent service and care to all patients and visitors, while also taking a scientific approach to monitoring their condition and analyzing their progress. This can be a fine line to walk and it’s okay to be stronger in one area than the other. But it is important that you’re happy and able to work in both of these areas.

The balance you’d have to strike between science and service in your career as a nurse varies depending on the type of nursing work you choose. Certified nursing Assistants (CNAs) and Licensed Practical Nurses (LPNs) tend to work either under Registered Nurses (RNs) or in care homes or home health facilities. These roles are often more weighted towards service, with some routine medical monitoring.

Specialized nursing roles like Nurse Practitioner, however, may require more extensive scientific skills and understanding. This position requires classification, treatment, and management of chronic diseases, interpretation of diagnostic tests, and performance of a wide range of procedures. It’s important to take into account where you want your balance to be between science and service when you’re planning your nursing career.

There is pleasure to be taken from both sides of the role, as Nurse Beth has found throughout here career. “I apply my expertise to each patient while being cognizant of their comfort and needs. I know how to start an IV with the least amount of pain while paying attention to their unspoken fears and anxiety. Sometimes I can administer subcutaneous insulin and they don’t even know it was given.

“I am as gratified brewing a cup of fresh coffee for my post-angiogram patient who was NPO for twelve hours as I am in recognizing when he shows early signs of a retroperitoneal bleed.

“Patients often don’t know my expertise because my critical thinking skills are always working on their behalf but behind the scenes. Even when they think we are just talking I’m critically assessing them. And in the words of Maya Angelou, they do know how I made them feel.”

To learn more about the different roles and responsibilities of nurse roles, take a look at our information on types of nurses.

6. On-Going Education is Important

One of the huge benefits of a career in nursing is the opportunities it offers for development and progress. There are so many ways for you to shape your career, whether it’s through diving into a specialism, like oncology, or striving for a senior role like Nurse Practitioner.

Nurse Beth has made a career out of advocating for nursing professional development, becoming a Nursing Professional Development Specialist. She believes that life-long learning is what will take nursing professionals to the next level. In her work, mentoring has been a big part of what can drive professional development, whether this is in a formal or informal setting.

To really get the most of all the incredible opportunities open to you on this career path, you need to be committed to on-going education. As a nurse, you’ll find opportunities for learning all around you every day. In addition to this, you should also pursue other opportunities to develop your skills. This could be reading academic articles, attending seminars and workshops, or undertaking new certificates and qualifications.

To keep up to date with qualifications and courses that will help your career in nursing, sign up to our newsletter.

SUBSCRIBE NOW

If these sound like qualities you possess, then a career in nursing could be the perfect path for you. Although nursing can be challenging, those in the profession are overwhelmingly happy with their choice. 83% of those surveyed by AMN Healthcare’s 2017 Survey of Registered Nurses said they were satisfied with their choice of career.

Being a nurse is one of the most fulfilling jobs in the world. It allows you to make a real, tangible difference in people’s lives and offer them support when they need it most.

It also offers fantastic stability, benefits, and advancement opportunities, so you can support you and your family. If you think you’re suited to a career in nursing and want to get started, sign up for our newsletter written by experts from American Nurses Associations (ANA), to get expert help on taking the next steps.

SIGN UP

Categories: Nurse Career Path

Should I be a Nurse?

By: American Nurses Association – Shared from the ANA website

6 Things to Consider When Choosing a Nursing Career

Nursing is a fantastic career choice that has a huge amount of benefits, ranging from fantastic opportunities to personal fulfillment. Before you jump into a nursing course or role, however, it’s important to make sure that the role fits you. Nursing can be one of the most rewarding careers in the world, but it does require commitment and compassion, so it’s best to get a realistic understanding of what’s involved before you start. We’ve highlighted six key things to consider before pursuing a career in nursing.

To give some insight into how these points affect real nurses, we’ve spoken with Beth Hawkes, a Registered Nurse, to see how she balances them in her work.

Beth Hawkes is a Nursing Professional Development Specialist with a long and diverse background in acute care. She’s a published author, owner of the award-winning blog, nursecode.com and popular career columnist for allnurses.com. She is widely known on social media as Nurse Beth.

1. Caring is Key

As a nurse, you’ll be there for your patients through the good times and bad, you’ll become a vital part of their support network and often play a pivotal role in their comfort and happiness. Being able to make a difference in people’s lives is one of the most fulfilling aspects of being a nurse. But it’s not without its challenges.

Supporting patients can be emotionally and psychologically draining. A busy schedule can mean you don’t always feel like you’re there as much as you like for your patients. It can also leave you finding yourself emotionally drained at the end of a difficult day. To be a successful nurse, you must be driven by compassion and the desire to help people. This will enable you to get satisfaction from your work, even during the tougher times.

Nurse Beth says that creating these caring connections is her favourite thing about being a nurse. She says “I didn’t know this before I became a nurse, but my favourite thing about my job is the connection I make with my patients in times of need. It’s a privilege to be allowed in that space. There is nothing more gratifying to me than providing comfort and safe passage. Sometimes it’s when I recognize early signs of sepsis and intervene. Other times it’s creating a safe, non-judgmental space. And sometimes it’s simply a warm blanket tucked in just so.”

2. Be Resilient

Resilience has long been cited as a key characteristic of those in nursing. The nature of the job you’re doing means you have to take the highs with the lows. Choosing nursing means you can be with people as they overcome some of the biggest challenges they’ll face in their lives. But you may also be there at their lowest points too.

It’s important to establish this skill at the beginning of your career. Nurse Beth learnt resilience early on, working in emotional situations. She says “I would empathize with a patient or family, maybe to the point of tears, but then step out into the hall and quickly be composed and available for my next patient. It’s when I cared for a brain dead 45-year-old mother of two being kept alive for organ harvesting while the eleven-year-old daughter was at the bedside. Being therapeutic means meeting my patients at their point of need, which calls for both sensitivity and resiliency.”

This can be emotionally draining and may mean you have to work with people at their most vulnerable and upset. It’s important for nurses to be resilient enough to work in a wide variety of situations and still be there for their patients. If you are compassionate and resilient, nursing is likely to be a fantastic and incredibly rewarding career for you.

3. The Pros and Cons of Shift Work

The demand for nursing never stops, so the reality of life for most nurses includes shift work and some unsociable hours. A regular nursing shift pattern involves three days working 12-hour shifts, followed by four days off. 12-hour shifts let nurses become involved in and familiar with their patients’ care plans and lessen the number of changes of staff. Meaning more consistency for those under their care.

Taking four days off following three days of shifts allows nurses to rest and relax, giving time to keep themselves in top condition to provide quality care for their patients. The three on, four off pattern of working also allows nurses time to spend with their family or pursue their hobbies.

In order to handle shift work and make the most of the potential benefits for your lifestyle it’s important to get the best sleep you can. Some helpful tips to achieve this include:

  • Block out light from your bedroom with window coverings or blackout blinds
  • Turn your phone off when trying to sleep
  • Invest in a good quality, comfortable, and supportive mattress and pillow
  • Ask for support from friends and family by being considerate of your sleeping pattern

Nurse Beth says that it is important to find a pattern that works for you, while pulling your weight as part of a team. “While less desirable shifts have to be shared fairly, I advocate for nurses finding the right fit for themselves, and managers working with their staff to help them do the same. Some nurses simply cannot tolerate night shift. Others thrive. When you find the right place for you, your performance is at its best.”

4. Keep Active

Being a nurse will definitely help you keep on your feet and remain active. A common part of the job is spending a lot of your time walking, doing rounds, and helping patients. A study from 2006 found that nurses walk an average of between four and five miles in the course of a 12-hour shift.

A good level of fitness is a great benefit to potential nurses. It’ll help you stay focused and energetic while getting your job done. It’s also worth taking care of your body and investing in shoes and clothing that will support your body and stave off fatigue. Supportive clogs and trainers can help prevent weary feet. If you make the choice to pursue nursing, try changing your shoes half-way through your shift. This way you’ll have the benefit of uncompressed support round the clock.

5. There’s a Balance Between Science and Service

A career in nursing means undertaking the dual roles of providing excellent service and care to all patients and visitors, while also taking a scientific approach to monitoring their condition and analyzing their progress. This can be a fine line to walk and it’s okay to be stronger in one area than the other. But it is important that you’re happy and able to work in both of these areas.

The balance you’d have to strike between science and service in your career as a nurse varies depending on the type of nursing work you choose. Certified nursing Assistants (CNAs) and Licensed Practical Nurses (LPNs) tend to work either under Registered Nurses (RNs) or in care homes or home health facilities. These roles are often more weighted towards service, with some routine medical monitoring.

Specialized nursing roles like Nurse Practitioner, however, may require more extensive scientific skills and understanding. This position requires classification, treatment, and management of chronic diseases, interpretation of diagnostic tests, and performance of a wide range of procedures. It’s important to take into account where you want your balance to be between science and service when you’re planning your nursing career.

There is pleasure to be taken from both sides of the role, as Nurse Beth has found throughout here career. “I apply my expertise to each patient while being cognizant of their comfort and needs. I know how to start an IV with the least amount of pain while paying attention to their unspoken fears and anxiety. Sometimes I can administer subcutaneous insulin and they don’t even know it was given.

“I am as gratified brewing a cup of fresh coffee for my post-angiogram patient who was NPO for twelve hours as I am in recognizing when he shows early signs of a retroperitoneal bleed.

“Patients often don’t know my expertise because my critical thinking skills are always working on their behalf but behind the scenes. Even when they think we are just talking I’m critically assessing them. And in the words of Maya Angelou, they do know how I made them feel.”

To learn more about the different roles and responsibilities of nurse roles, take a look at our information on types of nurses.

6. On-Going Education is Important

One of the huge benefits of a career in nursing is the opportunities it offers for development and progress. There are so many ways for you to shape your career, whether it’s through diving into a specialism, like oncology, or striving for a senior role like Nurse Practitioner.

Nurse Beth has made a career out of advocating for nursing professional development, becoming a Nursing Professional Development Specialist. She believes that life-long learning is what will take nursing professionals to the next level. In her work, mentoring has been a big part of what can drive professional development, whether this is in a formal or informal setting.

To really get the most of all the incredible opportunities open to you on this career path, you need to be committed to on-going education. As a nurse, you’ll find opportunities for learning all around you every day. In addition to this, you should also pursue other opportunities to develop your skills. This could be reading academic articles, attending seminars and workshops, or undertaking new certificates and qualifications.

To keep up to date with qualifications and courses that will help your career in nursing, sign up to our newsletter.

SUBSCRIBE NOW

If these sound like qualities you possess, then a career in nursing could be the perfect path for you. Although nursing can be challenging, those in the profession are overwhelmingly happy with their choice. 83% of those surveyed by AMN Healthcare’s 2017 Survey of Registered Nurses said they were satisfied with their choice of career.

Being a nurse is one of the most fulfilling jobs in the world. It allows you to make a real, tangible difference in people’s lives and offer them support when they need it most.

It also offers fantastic stability, benefits, and advancement opportunities, so you can support you and your family. If you think you’re suited to a career in nursing and want to get started, sign up for our newsletter written by experts from American Nurses Associations (ANA), to get expert help on taking the next steps.

SIGN UP

Categories: Nurse Career Path

Congratulations, Sumner College Graduates: Embracing New Beginnings

Congratulations to the new Sumner College nursing graduates. As the tassels are flipped and mortarboards soar into the sky, a chapter closes, and another begins.

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April BSN Info Sessions

Have you considered being a nurse and working in the healthcare industry? Attend an information meeting with Sumner College to learn more about the BSN

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The State of Wellness: Everything You Need to Know About the Oregon State Board of Nursing

You have likely heard about the Oregon State Board of Nursing (OSBN), but how does the organization interact with and support Oregon nurses? Join us

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OCN Explores Nursing Wages in New Research

Article & Photo Shared from Oregon Center for Nursing How much do Oregon nurses really make? The well-being of Oregon’s nursing workforce is a guiding initiative for

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New Classes Start Today!

March classes start today! Welcome to our new BSN, PN and RN-BSN students.

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Meet Alex – Sumner College Graduate

Alex, congratulations on your graduation! As you’ve embarked on your nursing journey, remember: ‘Nursing is not just a profession, it’s a calling to serve, heal,

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Meet Alexandra – Sumner College RN to BSN Graduate

Alexandra, congratulations on your graduation! As you’ve embarked on your nursing journey, remember: ‘Nursing is not just a profession, it’s a calling to serve, heal,

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Meet Renee – Sumner College Graduate

Renee, congratulations on your graduation! As you’ve embarked on your nursing journey, remember: ‘Nursing is not just a profession, it’s a calling to serve, heal,

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Meet Serena – Sumner College Graduate

Serena congratulations on your graduation! As you’ve embarked on your nursing journey, remember: ‘Nursing is not just a profession, it’s a calling to serve, heal,

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Meet Amanda – Sumner College Graduate

Amanda, congratulations on your graduation! As you’ve embarked on your nursing journey, remember: ‘Nursing is not just a profession, it’s a calling to serve, heal,

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Meet Natalie – Sumner College Graduate

Natalie, congratulations on your graduation! As you’ve embarked on your nursing journey, remember: ‘Nursing is not just a profession, it’s a calling to serve, heal,

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Now Hiring

Are you a healthcare educator? Sumner College is looking for our next Nursing Educator to join our team. This is a part time position. Read

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Meet Erin – Sumner College Graduate

Erin, congratulations on your graduation! As you’ve embarked on your nursing journey, remember: ‘Nursing is not just a profession, it’s a calling to serve, heal,

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Exploring the Vital Role of Nurses in Heart Health

Article Shared from DiversityNursing.com February is American Heart Month. It's important to promote cardiovascular health and explore the many ways Nurses are engaged in these

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Meet Anne Marie – Sumner College Graduate

Anne Marie, congratulations on your graduation! As you've embarked on your nursing journey, remember: 'Nursing is not just a profession, it's a calling to serve,

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Nursing Ranked Most Trusted Profession for 22nd Year

Article Shared from DiversityNursing.com In Gallup's 2023 Honesty and Ethics poll, Americans' evaluations of almost all 23 professions have experienced a decline compared to previous years.

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Helpful Apps Every Nurse Should Have

Article shared from DiversityNursing.com Mobile apps have transformed how Nurses provide care to their patients. Smartphones allow Nurses easy access to applications designed to assist

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DiversityNursing.com – Helpful Resources

Helpful Resources DiversityNursing.com is a Career Job Board, Community and Information Resource for all Nurses regardless of age, race, gender identity, religion, education, national origin,

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How to Prepare for College – Oregon Goes to School

Article shared from Oregon Goes to College  It’s a plan! No matter what grade you’re in, you can get ready for your future. Getting ready

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Sumner College Clinical Partners

Sumner College clinical partnerships play a crucial role in advancing medical education and training. By offering opportunities for hands-on experience and mentorship, these collaborations help

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Commencement Ceremony

Save the date - April 6, 2024 for Sumner College's Commencement Ceremony. Celebrating cohorts: PN54, PN55, ADN23, RN-BSN10 and RN-BSN11 Congratulations to you all!! Tickets

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Healthcare Hero

Are you aspiring to be a healthcare hero? A common question from our nursing students at Sumner College is about the role of ER nurses

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Dynamic – Interactive – Rich with Real-world Relevance

RNs are you ready to take your nursing career to the next level with a BSN? Guess what - at Sumner College, you can achieve

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ER Nursing

Have you been thinking, “How can I start my nursing career in an ER?" Begin by obtaining a solid understanding of nursing through an approved

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LPN

At Sumner College, we understand the importance of every role in the nursing field, including the dedicated work of Licensed Practical Nurses (LPNs). LPNs are

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Flexible – Balanced – Online RN to BSN

Wondering what it's like to pursue a nursing degree online? At Sumner College, our RN to BSN program fits the busy lives of working nurses

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Nursing, beyond direct patient care

Thinking about a career in nursing but interested in roles beyond direct patient care? At Sumner College, we recognize that nursing offers diverse career paths,

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Jobs in 2031 will likely require postsecondary education

Degrees and credentials after high school will become increasingly important in the job market, a new report found. Analysis from the Georgetown University Center on

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Evolving Healthcare Landscape for Job Opportunities

As we enter 2024, the healthcare landscape continues to evolve, bringing exciting job opportunities for Practical Nurses. Nurses are able to work in different environments

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RNs, what is your next step in advancing your career in nursing?

Are you a Registered Nurse wondering what the next step is in your career? Explore why pursuing a Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) at

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